Foreign Policy

Sunday Night Owls: Rethinking anti-monopoly policy could limit corporate power

[…] These Rethinking antitrust policy and the actions it spawned couldn’t come at a more critical time. As the pandemic consolidates markets, new mergers are emerging – from Regional banks to large pharmaceutical companies to the The world’s largest cannabis company is announced daily. The level of mergers and acquisitions is “exceptional,” says Goldman Felds’ senior M&A banker Stephan Feldgoise, and he expects it to be come with job loss, as is typical with concentration.

The lawsuits against Google and Facebook will last for years. The defenders of Big Tech and Lobbyists will defame them and Bargain for an agreement of the antimonopoly dispute. The falls could even fail. It does not matter. The political center of America is now convinced that the situation in American companies is out of control. Public opinion supports this perspective. The network of antimonopoly thinkers, scholars and activists has grown. Have the arguments for enabling monopoly power was revealed to be weak. Nothing will stop this development from the laissez-faire of the Chicago School to the preservation of freedom and democracy.

Barry Lynn, an intellectual godfather of the new antimonopoly movement, wrote this week that Joe Biden must make the decision to use whatever anti-corporate power laws he has at his disposal and break with the failed consensus of his Obama-era confidantes who didn’t break corporate power when they broke every opportunity had to. I agree that it matters, but I disagree entirely that it is Biden’s decision. The genie is out of the bottle. The nation has already made its decision. Biden can lead, follow, or avoid the way.

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BLAST FROM THE PAST

At Daily Kos that day in 2005– Shame: NY Times knew before the election:

The LA Times reported this morning that the The NY Times had domestic surveillance history prior to the 2004 presidential election.

The New York Times debated the publication of a story about secret wiretapping of Americans last fall, ahead of the 2004 presidential election.

But the newspaper kept the story for more than a year, only revealing the clandestine wiretapping last Friday when it was discovered that a book by one of its reporters would spread the news, according to journalists familiar with the newspaper’s internal discussions.

The NY Times sat on the biggest story of the year. The NY Times sat on the news that the President of the United States was illegally spying on the citizens of that country. The NY Times knew that the government was illegally policing the American people before those very Americans went to vote to elect a president. Hmmmm … it would have been handy to have this information on November 2nd, 2004, wouldn’t it? Why did they hold it? Do you want to explain that, Bill Keller?

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